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Hey! My friend e-mailed me some Spanish sayings and I have no idea what they mean. I tried using this sites translator but the translations make no sense. Can someone translate these for me?

1.) El ejercicio hace al maestro.

2.) Sana, sana, colita de rana, si no sanas hoy, sanarás mañana.

3.) Quien va a Sevilla pierde su silla.

4.) Entra por aquí y sale por allá.

5.) El traje no hace al hombre.

6.) Llueve a cántaros.

Thanks alot!

  • Posted Oct 2, 2008
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7 Answers

0 Vote

lol

0 Vote

I've just looked up(1) because it looked so ridiculous.
'Get well, get well little frog's bottom, if you don't get well today you'll get well tomorrow'
Apparently it's what mamas say when their child has hurt themselves (whilst rubbing it better)

(6) is the only one I've heard before, it means to rain heavily (to rain 'cat's and dogs')

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1.) El ejercicio hace al maestro. "only if you practise something, you will be an expert, a master

2.) Sana, sana, colita de rana, si no sanas hoy, sanarás mañana. This is a sentence we say to children when they hurt. Well, I usually say "Sana, sana, culito de rana, si no te curas hoy te curarás mañana", but it's the same.

3.) Quien va a Sevilla pierde su silla. "if you go you'll lost something (your seat, your position in a queue). We usually say this when somebody decides to go away and when he comes back there is someone new when he previously was.

4.) Entra por aquí y sale por allá. Whe usually say this when somebody tells me something that is not important for me. Whe say too "me entra por un oído y me sale por otro" like saying "yes, yes, i'm hearing you but it doesn't matter for me" in a contemptuously way. "I'm not going to do what you are telling me", or something like that. In spanish we say to "como quien oye llover" because you are hearing something or someone but you do nothing, it's not important for you.

5.) El traje no hace al hombre. Your appearance is not important. It's similar to say "Appearances can be deceptive" or "you should not judge by appearances", but when you're speaking about people.

6.) Llueve a cántaros. It rains cats and dogs (i think this is the english expression)

0 Vote

tad said:

I've just looked up(1) because it looked so ridiculous. 'Get well, get well little frog's bottom, if you don't get well today you'll get well tomorrow'

Apparently it's what mamas say when their child has hurt themselves (whilst rubbing it better)

(6) is the only one I've heard before, it means to rain heavily (to rain 'cat's and dogs')

corrections:(1) (1)=(2)
(2) cat's = cats

0 Vote

I've heard numbers 1, 2, 3 and 6 many times in my life; the other two only on rare occasions.

0 Vote

Imhierro has explained these nicely, but I'll try English translations.

1.) El ejercicio hace al maestro.
Practice makes perfect.

2.) Sana, sana, colita de rana, si no sanas hoy, sanarás mañana.
No equivalent rhyme in English, but we would say "I'll kiss it make it feel better."

3.) Quien va a Sevilla pierde su silla.
"While the cat's away, the mice will play" is similar, but different. We might also say "You snooze, you lose" (meaning, if you don't pay attention, someone else will get ahead of you, etc.)

4.) Entra por aquí y sale por allá.
In one ear and out the other.

5.) El traje no hace al hombre.
Interestingly, in English we have the opposite saying: "The clothes make the man." For the Spanish, we might say "Don't judge a book by its cover."

6.) Llueve a cántaros.
It's pouring (outside).

0 Vote

In regards to #6 a "cantaro" is a clay vessel or container used to carry water from a well or river to your home. So even though "It is raining cats and dogs" also describes a very strong rain a closer translation would be "It is raining buckets".

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