"Voy" , "Voy a ", "Voy a ir a"? | SpanishDict Answers
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0 Vote

how can i make a difference,when i should use first one or last one?

yo voy al restaurante...?
me voy a la ciudad...?
voy a ir a bailar...?

thank you!

  • Posted Aug 26, 2008
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14 Answers

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HI Alice!

One and two are the same.

Ira a hacer algo (number 3) : near future

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Heidita,

Ok, in the first 2 examples you are dealing with 2 different verbs (ir and irse) . I understand that. But in the 3 rd example are we trying to say " I'm going to dance" or " I'm going to go dancing" or what ? I'm a bit confused here because this isn't futuro is it '

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i wanted to say the last one in future

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Yes, a translation that preserves the (temporal) distinction would be "I am going to go dancing" as opposed to (simply) "I'm going dancing."

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do i understand that right?

Yo voy a la playa (present)
Yo voy a ir a la playa iré = voy a ir (future)
Yo iré a la playa (future)

so these sentences should be right also?

1)Hoy necesito voy a la universisad.
2)Mañana necesitaré voy a ir a la tienda con mis amigas.

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You got the idea correct , alice:

ir a hacer algo: near future

1)Hoy necesito ir a la universidad. (present)

You cannot use two conjugated verbs.

But you cannot mix both futures:

2)Mañana necesitaré voy a ir a la tienda con mis amigas.

You could say:

Mañana voy a ir a la tienda...

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James Schneider said:

Heidita,Ok, in the first 2 examples you are dealing with 2 different verbs (ir and irse) . I understand that. But in the 3 rd example are we trying to say " I'm going to dance" or " I'm going to go dancing" or what ? I'm a bit confused here because this isn't futuro is it ?

Hi James, yes, ti is future.

in English this near future can be expressed by

present continuous: I am eating with my father tonight.

Here in Spanish we would most likely use present simple:

Esta noche como con mi padre.

Or

going to: I am going to eat with my father .

Voy a comer con mi padre.

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Heidi, I am not an English teacher, but are you sure about the "near future" explanation of the present continuous? Can you not say "I am leaving for Harvard next year" even if that will happen 364 days after saying it?

I'm asking because in Spanish you can use the present regardless of how "near" the future is: "Me voy a Harvard el año que viene / dentro de 50 años". Also, you can say "Vamos a extinguirnos dentro de un millón de años", which is not exactly what I'd call a near future.

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I confess that I've never heard of the "near future".(as opposed to the simple future). I would take "I am eating with my father tonight." as being a, somewhat elliptical, way of saying "I am going to (or I will) eat with my father tonight. I would also take the Spanish "esta noche como..." as an "implied future". (this may not be a widely accepted grammatical term) but, as far as I know "near future" isn't either.
In other words,

I'm not an English teacher either (though I'm the son and elder brother, of English teachers [obviously I'm referring to two different people}) and I agree with Lazarus' reply; it's not the "nearness" it's the "futurity" that matters (in English).

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Heidita said:

You got the idea correct , alice:

ir a hacer algo: near future

1)Hoy necesito ir a la universidad. (present)

You cannot use two conjugated verbs.

But you cannot mix both futures:

2)Mañana necesitaré voy a ir a la tienda con mis amigas.

You could say:

Mañana voy a ir a la tienda...


I'm troubled by what I take to be your rejection of "Mañana necesitaré ir a la tienda con mis amigas.
"
If you're simply rejecting the original sentence, I have no problem. but if you mean to reject "Mañana necesitaré ir a la tienda con mis amigas.", i have a question. In English, I can distinguish between a necessity that becomes apparent (or, is operative) tomorrow versus one that exists now. Admittedly, this is a rather subtle distinction (and, probably, rare to non-existent in normal conversation).

For me, "Tomorrow, I need to go shopping." and "Tomorrow i will need to go shopping." are, at best, similar (but certainly not the same).
\

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Hi Alice,
I agree with Heidita regarding sentence one and two. However I will add just a little more:
In the first two sentences Yo and Me refers to the (subject person, (I)). Yo and Me do not
give any indication of gender. Voy agrees with both Yo and Me and can actually be dropped
without any sacrafice of meaning. "Voy al restaurante and Voy a la cuidad" both expresses
an action that the subject (El or Ella) is taking.

Melvinhc

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Isn't it easier to say:
Voy al restaurante...?
Voy a la ciudad...?
Voy a bailar...'

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TimEivissa said:

Isn't it easier to say:Voy al restaurante...'Voy a la ciudad...'Voy a bailar...?

All of thesis sentences are present simple, Tim.

voy a ir: future

yes, "near future" is a term used but doesn't necessarily apply to Spanish:

Actions happening at the present moment. Near future intention and scheduling.
http://esl.about.com/library/grammar/blgr_verbforms.htm

I always try to teach students the "near future" in English with the presenting continuous and further futures with going to+inf. or will...

Not a strict grammar term, but works fine.

So: ira a +infinitvo can either be translated as

going to +inf.

present continuous

future (will)

Spanish is mucho more flexible than English.

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*I'm troubled by what I take to be your rejection of "Mañana necesitaré ir a la tienda con mis amigas.

"*Samdie: the origianl sentence was this one:

2) Mañana necesitaré voy a ir a la tienda con mis amigas.

both futures: ira a hacer algo/futuro simple

are used in the same sentence.

You must either use:

voy a ir a la tienda.

OR

iré a la tienda.

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