Agua que no has de beber, déjala correr. Do you know what it means? | SpanishDict Answers
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8 Vote

Agua que no has de beber, déjala correr is a very common Spanish phrase. Can you guess what it means and share it with the forum?

Here's an example of usage:

Te recomiendo mantenerte al margen de este asunto. Sabes bien que: "Agua que no has de beber, déjala correr".

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  • I love these posts! - --Mariana-- Oct 17, 2012 flag
  • Should it be 'déjale correr' not 'déjala correr'? I hesitate to ask but have to for my own clarification! ;-)) - pml222 Oct 17, 2012 flag
  • I love these posts too! - pml222 Oct 17, 2012 flag
  • deja el agua correr (déjala.. direct object) le would be indirect... - francobollo Oct 17, 2012 flag
  • It's called "leísmo", it's largely a Spanish phenomenon, it's not standard Spanish and it is very rare in LatAm - diagonx Oct 17, 2012 flag

22 Answers

9 Vote

Hmmmmm....haven't heard this one.

Maybe: mind your own business? If the situation has nothing to do with you, stay out of it?

5 Vote

The English equivalent is,

Don't be a dog in the manger - Someone who spitefully prevents others from having something that they themselves have no use for.

The short form of the fable as cited by Laura Gibbs is "There was a dog lying in a manger who did not eat the grain but who nevertheless prevented the horse from being able to eat anything either". So in other words if you don't want it let someone else have it.

  • I'm going to have to look that one up. Never heard of it here in the US. - francobollo Oct 17, 2012 flag
  • Yes, dog in the manger gets my vote. - annierats Oct 17, 2012 flag
4 Vote

Don't drink this water, go to the bar and have some wine, thereby you help will the Spanish economymore and you will also feel better in yourself.

Por favor, el agua no es potable, no bébela, vete al bar y toma un vaso de vino para ayudar a la economia de España y sin duda te sentirás mejor muy pronto. .

I'm sorry, I can't do the imperative without at least two more glasses of wine.

2 Vote

Let it pass you by.

Bridge over troubled waters, to quote the old song.

  • Actually, having listened to the song, it has little relevance, the words just sprang to mind.. - annierats Oct 17, 2012 flag
  • I did not want to be mean and tell you that you were way off.. lol - francobollo Oct 17, 2012 flag
2 Vote

Is this similar to "No te metes el hocicio,en donde no importas!" (Keep your nose out of my business)

2 Vote

Only use what you need.

2 Vote

YOu should let the bad water flow. I donmt know how to explain but I do know what it means

2 Vote

OK , try again:

If you're not going to use the water yourself, let it run on so that somebody downstream can use it?

i.e. don't ivolve yourself, you will only cause trouble for others if you do???

2 Vote

If you don't have to stick your nose in it (someone else's business) then stay out of it.

"Live and let live"

2 Vote

Stay out of others business?

2 Vote

Don't interfere with or take things that you don't need? smile

2 Vote

If it's not good for you, let it go.

2 Vote

Water you are not going to drink, let it flow.

2 Vote

If it's of no use to you let it go.

2 Vote

Let sleeping dogs lie. ??

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