how do i say talk to you tomorrow | SpanishDict Answers
0 Vote

wanna tell someone i will talk to them tomorrow

  • Posted Dec 16, 2011
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  • Welcome to the forum, please remember to use proper capitalization and punctuation on all of your posts. - Yeser007 Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • Talk to you tomorrow or talk to them tomorrow?Two different questions - xicotillo Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • Kind of confusing .... - Jack-OBrien Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • Shouldn't be Jack, not in American English. I'm certain Trae's question is "talk to you tomorrow" - Yeser007 Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • Yesero in English from England this would suggest two questions and is obviously ambiguous :) - FELIZ77 Dec 17, 2011 flag

12 Answers

3 Vote

Hello Trae and welcome to the SpanishDict forum grin

You could say:

''Voy a hablar contigo mañana''

='' I will (Lit: I am going to) speak to you tomorrow'' when addressing a friend/family member or someone you know well

This ir a construction is what is known as the immediate future and can be used for actions that will take place in the near future. For events taking place at some indeterminate time in the future eg: next month/year the future indicative would be used. Iré hablar contigo el año que viene = I will speak to you next year

''Voy a hablar con Ud mañana''**

''I will talk with you tomorrow'' when addressing a stranger, someone in authority

''Voy a hablar con Uds mañana''

'' I will talk with you tomorrow'' when addressing a group of people

I hope this helps grin

Corrijan mi español, por favor grin

2 Vote

I am pretty sure that to be grammatically correct, you need to have some form of "hablar" than the present form.

It is perfectly acceptable to say Mañana, te hablo.

  • Mañana les hablo is correct because he will talk to them or ellos. - xicotillo Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • The title question was "talk to you (which is singular in English)", so I answered that. The he made a statement "I will talk to them" - Jack-OBrien Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • which I was not responding to. - Jack-OBrien Dec 16, 2011 flag
2 Vote

If it's meant as a sort of farewell or parting phrase, something along the lines of "talk to you later" or "see you later," then you might use something like:

Nos hablamos mañana or Mañana nos hablamos.

  • Yes, you are probably right Izan but the way the questioner phrased their question was a little unclear as to whether he meant a parting phrase or a statement - FELIZ77 Dec 17, 2011 flag
2 Vote

All of you are right but everybody is missing the point Wanna tell someone i will talk to them tomorrow Quiero decirle a alguien , Mañana les hablo or Mañana le hablare. Talk to you tomorrow or talk to them tomorrow?Two different questions

2 Vote

Talk to you tomorrow or talk to them tomorrow? Two different questions

Not really.

However right or wrong, it is very common in English to use the word "them" to mean one person.

For example:

Hey, if you see your brother tomorrow, tell them I said hello!

This will be shortened to:

Hey, if you see your brother tomorrow, tell 'em I said hello!

I consider myself to be fairly versed in English grammar... and I still get caught up saying things like this! smile

  • eez Tosh do you really say that as per your example? I always say and hear tell'm which is short for tell him or them depending on theperson or persons I am referring to but in your example I would never consider your brother to be a them. - Yeser007 Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • I do agree with what you are trying to say about Trae's question but it seems you are going about it the wrong way. Just my observation. - Yeser007 Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • Well... I hear it much more than I would ever say it. You have never heard somebody talking about ONE person... and somebody else say... Hey, I know them! I'm sure you have. ;) - Tosh Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • Or somebody talking about another person... and somebody overhears the name and says... Man, I hate them! - Tosh Dec 16, 2011 flag
  • Perhaps to put it in better words, I see nothing confusing or wrong with Trae's question. He wants to know how to say "talk to you tomorrow" because he wants to tell someone (we will call him Bob) that "I will talk to you tomorrow Bob. - Yeser007 Dec 16, 2011 flag
2 Vote

The confusion in translation here was caused by the fact that in England we use the word them in English to refer to the singular: one person and the plural many people (a group).

While this is not necessarily grammatically correct it has become entered into common usage many years ago and is still often heard today.This can cause a great deal of confusion for natives of other languages. I have grown up hearing this and still use this form on occasions usually with other native English speakers.

Therefore those answering and translating the phrase for many people are correct as also those who knew it could relate to one person. I tried to cover both situations in my post but I was unsure as to wthether it was supposed to be a parting comment or not. At least the questioner now knows how to say the phrase both ways; colloquially as a parting comment the way Izan offered it and also as a phrase.(as I have done) I think that we have all successfully covered all bases! (every angle)

2 Vote

All of you are right but everybody is missing the point Talk to you tomorrow or talk to them tomorrow? Two different questions

I'm not sure that everyone is missing the point. The original question pertained to the following idea:

How does one say, "I will talk to you tomorrow."

However, as xicotillo pointed out, the original question was phrased as follows:

wanna tell someone i will talk to them tomorrow

If conventional grammar rules had been followed, this statement would have been written as:

I want to tell someone that I will talk to them tomorrow.

I think that some of the confusion arises from the lack of agreement that occurs between the pronoun "someone" and the pronoun "them." Just to be clear, it is the pronoun "someone" which governs this sentence and which lets us know that it is a single person that we are talking about.

The question then, is, "How is it possible for a singular noun phrase to act as the referent for a plural pronoun?" or more specifically, "How is it possible for the word them (a plural pronoun) to refer to the word someone (a singular pronoun)?"

The answer lies in the fact that English is a gender neutral language in all cases except when it comes to third person singular pronouns. Because of this discrepancy, certain problems arise when we need to refer to a single individual whose sex is unknown. In these situations, we have a few options available:

I. Traditional

►How do I tell someone that I will talk to him tomorrow.

►If you see a police officer, tell him I need help.

►If your child acts up in school, he should be reprimanded.

Despite the fact that in English, the masculine pronoun has traditionally been used in situations where the biological sex of the referent is unknown, this usage—largely due to the influences of the feminist movement of the 20th century—is viewed by many as sexist and outdated.

II. Gender neutral: Option I

►How do I tell someone that I will talk to him or her tomorrow.

►If you see a police officer, tell him or her I need help.

►If your child acts up in school, he or she should be reprimanded.

While this option conforms more to the idea of gender neutrality, using expressions such as "him or her" and "he or she" can become very unwieldy and aesthetically unappealing in texts where the phrase must be repeated.

III. Gender neutral: Option II

►How do I tell someone that I will talk to them tomorrow.

►If you see a police officer, tell them I need help.

►If your child acts up in school, they should be reprimanded.

In this case, we find the pronoun "them" to be an acceptably gender neutral expression; however, with this word we are faced with the grammatical inconsistency of using a plural pronoun to refer to a singular noun phrase. Even so, this is often the most widely used and accepted alternative in contemporary English.

IV. Hyperfeminine

►How do I tell someone that I will talk to her tomorrow.

►If you see a police officer, tell her I need help.

►If your child acts up in school, she should be reprimanded.

In some instances, authors have been know to completely reject the masculine form. In these cases, they opt instead to "reshape" the language to their particular political viewpoint in choosing to use the feminine pronoun as the default form. Here we see the pendulum swing in the complete opposite direction of traditional usage, and as a result, this form can be just as controversial to traditionalists as the traditional form is to "gender neutral" proponents.

V. Completely Unacceptable

►How do I tell someone that I will talk to "it" tomorrow.

►If you see a police officer, tell "it" I need help.

►If your child acts up in school, "it" should be reprimanded.

Even though the English language does have a gender neutral singular pronoun (it), this usage is never considered acceptable as the pronoun "it" is generally reserved for inanimate objects or wild animals. Because of this, using "it" to describe a human referent would come of sounding ridiculous in most cases and in some some few cases might even be considered offensive. For example, it would probably be best to avoid referring to another person's child or spouse as an "it." In some instances, purposely doing so could be construed as making a comparison between that person and a savage or a wild beast. That is, the pronoun "it," in some rare cases, can be used to act as a sort of metaphor to describe the "bestial" or "inhuman" nature of another person. For example (and this might be a bit stereotyped but), referring to a particularly unpleasant mother-in-law: "Oh no! It's coming to dinner!" In any case, such usage is extremely (emphasis added) rare, and as a student of English, it would be advisable to avoid it.

1 Vote

I am pretty sure that to be grammatically correct, you need to have some form of "hablar" than the present form. "I will" suggests a future tense. Just saying.

  • Yes, you are correct in saying that I will refers to the future indicative :) - FELIZ77 Dec 16, 2011 flag
1 Vote

III. Gender neutral: Option II

►How do I tell someone that I will talk to them tomorrow.

►If you see a police officer, tell them I need help.

►If your child acts up in school, they should be reprimanded.

In this case, we find the pronoun "them" to be an acceptably gender neutral expression; however, with this word we are faced with the grammatical inconsistency of using a plural pronoun to refer to a singular noun phrase. Even so, this is often the most widely used and accepted alternative in contemporary English.

This is exactly what I was talking about! smile

0 Vote

There are two ways to express the future tense in Spanish without actually using the indicative which is=( Te hablaré(I will talk to you) mañana/ Hablaré contigo mañana, both informal)

Informal 1. Voy a hablarte mañana (I'm going to talk to you tomorrow) / Voy hablar contigo mañana. (I'm going to talk/speak with you tomorrow)

Informal 2. Te hablo mañana. (I talk to you tomorrow) ---Correct Spanish incorrect English.

0 Vote

Entiendo "Nos hablamos mañana" y "Mañana nos hablamos," pero lo que no entiendo ni madres son las palabras "wanna" y "i."

  • Hi Julian...the "wanna" is "want to" all run together. It's how we say it out loud. - SusanaEspana Dec 17, 2011 flag
0 Vote

you can say 'Voy a hablar contigo mañana or.. Voy a hablar con Ud mañana or.. Voy a hablar con Uds mañana good luck and have a nice day

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