Niña del ojo? | SpanishDict Answers
report this ad
2 Vote

I am trying to find an expression to mean la pupila, the round part in your eye.

In English, you say 'apple of one's eye' to mean a pupile. In Spanish, what expression can replace la pupila?

Some people on the internet say I can use 'niña del ojo,' but my friend from Argentina says he's never heard of it. I wrote this question to my friend from Spain, but her response sounds unclear...

So, please let me know if you know what 'niña del ojo' means. And let me know which Spanish-speaking country you are from. Thanks.

7 Answers

4 Vote

Yes, it is la "niña" del ojo.

At least in Chile.

2 Vote

Hmmh, the only time I've heard of apple of one's eye in English is to say that someone is your dear one.

  • It means both. Something precious, as well as the pupil of an eye. - boseulized Aug 14, 2011 flag
1 Vote

Interesting, I have never heard of 'the apple of your eye' used in this way. To me it means someone special, who you love a lot, often a child.

As in, I love both my children but my daughter is the apple of my eye. (Don't tell her I said that)

Thinking about it that makes sense, maybe the fact that it means pupil is where the expression comes from, i.e. the one you love most is in the centre of your eye.

1 Vote

Look in the Bible, Proverbs 7:2 in English & Spanish. Niño de tu ojo or apple of your eye. You are correct.

  • Niña de tu ojo... Dog gone spell checker - PecosPhil Oct 28, 2011 flag
1 Vote

La pupila es un orificio situado en la parte central del iris por el cual penetra la luz al interior del globo ocular. Se trata de una abertura dilatable y contráctil, aparentemente de color negro que tiene la función de regular la cantidad de iluminación que le llega a la retina, en la parte posterior del ojo. También es llamada "la niña del ojo".

de este artículo

apple of my eye

Meaning

Originally meaning the central aperture of the eye. Figuratively it is something, or more usually someone, cherished above others.

  • Thanks, it is a term I have used often, but I have never thought about its origin. - MaryMcc Oct 28, 2011 flag
1 Vote

Te quiero como a la niña de los ojos.

0 Vote

Ahhhh

Answer this Question
report this ad