Tengo que irme? | SpanishDict Answers
10 Vote

If you keep the 2nd verb in it's infinitive form to express an obligation:

Tengo que comer.

Tienes que estudiar.

And if "irse" means "to leave", then why do you change it to:

Tengo que irme.

Why isn't it: Tengo que irse. question

Is it different with reflexive verbs? Would, "I have to bathe" be:

Tengo que bañarme. And would, "You have to bathe." be:

Tienes que bañarte.

Note: I'm sure somebody will tell me it's not reflexive, but rather pronomial, but I still can't tell the difference. smirk

  • It's *pronominal*. Pronomial is not an English word. You can check on Webster, Oxford or dictionary.com for proof. - Deanski Jul 1, 2011 flag
  • Pronominal, please, pronominal! - lazarus1907 Jul 1, 2011 flag
  • Pro + nominal. The root "omial" does not exist. - lazarus1907 Jul 1, 2011 flag
  • spelling: "its" - no apostrophe for possessive pronoun. - pesta Jul 1, 2011 flag
  • Sorry. Just a typo. I know it's "pronominal". - Tosh Jul 1, 2011 flag

10 Answers

9 Vote

Why isn't it: Tengo que irse.

Let's take the example of the reflexive verb "bañarse". The infinitve translated into English would be "to bathe oneself".

Now, again in English, you wouldn't say something like "I have to bathe oneself" would you? You would say "I have to bathe myself." Same thing in Spanish.

I hope this made sense.

2 Vote

Awesome stuff Tosh, you could give a lesson with that information. wink

  • Of course you're right - Dakie Jun 30, 2011 flag
2 Vote

Think of this enclitic pronoun (attached at the end of the verb) as pointing at the place that will be abandoned after someone has left. "Tengo que ir..." makes it clear who is leaving; "me" focuses on my original location after I have gone to another place.

1 Vote

Note: I'm sure somebody will tell me it's not reflexive, but rather pronomial, but I still can't tell the difference.

Reflexive verbs are a part of the broader group encompassed by the term pronominal verbs.

  • Good explanation Web:) - FELIZ77 Jul 1, 2011 flag
  • I see you fixed your typo ;). - Tosh Jul 1, 2011 flag
1 Vote

Of course! Like the reflexive verb "to see oneself" is "verse".

And something like "I want to see myself in the mirror" is either:

Quiero verme en el espejo. -or-

Me quiero ver en el espejo.

I think I am owed a very big "DUH" for this question. rolleyes

  • Well just look at it this way tosh you will be in a better position now to help others to understand it :) - FELIZ77 Jul 1, 2011 flag
  • I can't resist ... "Duh!!!" - That's for both of us. - Of course it always looks easier once the right explanation is given :) - pesta Jul 1, 2011 flag
  • It will all become second nature in no time :-) - gintar77 Jul 1, 2011 flag
0 Vote

Yep, you have the right idea!

0 Vote

In my limited understanding of the situation, I believe irse is not actually a verb. It is often written as if it were, but in reality it is just what you write to denote that irse means something separate from ir alone.

In essence, the reason you write irme is because irse isn't actually the infinitive, ir is the infinitive and se denotes that this verb can be used reflexively.

0 Vote

I think the thing is that the first verb (in this case, tener) is conjugated but the following reflexive verb doesn't need to be, but the reflexive pronoun (-se) still needs to match the subject you are talking about.Your example sounds about right. I think "irse" is reflexive, literally means to take yourself someplace else. Whenever I have to say it, I can say:

  • "Tengo que irme." or
  • "Me tengo que ir."
0 Vote

This is a good case, check the little difference and how we can say a different thing.

If we use this way we say we are leaving a place.

I = Tengo que irme You = Tienes que irte We = Tenemos que irnos You = Tienen que irse

But, if we use this way we say we are going to go to a place

I = Tengo que ir You = Tienes que ir We = Tenemos que ir You = Tienen que ir

0 Vote

Is it different with reflexive verbs? Would, "I have to bathe" be: Tengo que bañarme. And would, "You have to bathe." be: Tienes que bañarte. Note: I'm sure somebody will tell me it's not reflexive, but rather pronomial, but I still can't tell the difference

Your first two sentences are correct and "bañarse" is, indeed, reflexive. "irse", on the other hand, is pronominal. "ir" is intransitive (as is to go/leave) in English. It cannot possibly take a direct object (much less a direct object that reflects back on the subject).

  • Great observation as always samdie. - Deanski Jul 1, 2011 flag
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