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1 Vote

is this right in spanish?

allá en la mesa means over there on the table?

9 Answers

2 Vote

If you look in the dictionary, it helps describe the difference.

Allá - "over there" in sense of a general area, or as the reference says "indica espacio"

Allí - "over there" in sense of a single location, or as the reference says "lugar determinado"

In this case, I would use "allí" because on the table is one location.

Hopefully someone could explain this better, until then, I hope this helps grin

It's a matter of context. If I'm standing in the kitchen at the stove and my wife asks me if her book is there by the stove, I can answer "no está aquí". She then asks me if the book is on the bar, which is a bit further away, I can answer "no está allí". Well, how about on the table, is it there? (which is in the dining room), I can answer "no, no está allá". There are three distinctly different locations in distance, even though we're in the same house.

  • A very clear and helpful explanation. - faliron Apr 23, 2011 flag
1 Vote

It's just a matter of distance. If something is here, right in front of me, it can be aquí, it it's a little further away (I can't quite reach it, perhaps), it can be allí (over there). For something even further away, it can be allá. It's a matter of perspective, allá can be over there on the table, or on the distant horizon.

0 Vote

I think it does mean "there." In fact I've been told and read that is the meaning. But there is also "allí" which is also "there." If someone who knows will explain the difference between them - I'd appreciate it. Thank you.

0 Vote

If you look in the dictionary, it helps describe the difference.

Allá - "over there" in sense of a general area, or as the reference says "indica espacio"

Allí - "over there" in sense of a single location, or as the reference says "lugar determinado"

In this case, I would use "allí" because on the table is one location.

Hopefully someone could explain this better, until then, I hope this helps grin

0 Vote

Rather than allá in spain it is aquel or aquellá depending on gender.

  • Hmm? I have learned that "aquel and aquella" are demonstrative adjectives - or demo pronouns if modified with the accent on the stressed syllable. Allá and allí are adverbs. Am I mistaken? - Otravez Apr 23, 2011 flag
0 Vote

but my cuban friend told his daughter muevete para allá and sientate allá, so are allí and allá synonmous?

  • I would imagine he was intending to give certain meaning to his request. Saying "Muevete por alla" means "move over there" as opposed to "move right there"; likewise, "sientate por alla" would be closer to "sit over there" instead of "sit right there" - ecantado44 Apr 23, 2011 flag
0 Vote

Here was the way I learned the 5 of these ...

  1. acá: here (nearest)
  2. aquí: here (near)
  3. ahí: there (a little less near)
  4. allí: there (even less near)
  5. allá: there (even farther away) -- "over there"

So I remembered these in this order nearest to farthest away.

0 Vote

Based on the explanations given, it seems to be a matter of the speaker's judgment about the magnitude of distance to "there." That judgment is "conveyed" by the choice of the adverb. Not everyone necessarily will agree with the judgment, or even care about it; it is something like the the sharps and flats between whole notes. To some a mistake between the tone of two whole notes may sound like a terrible "clinker." Others may wince a bit, but not think it an unforgiveable mistake and others may not even notice it. Thanks for the explanations. I

0 Vote

Daniel:

You have number 1 and 2 mixed...it should be:

Here was the way I learned the 5 of these ...

  1. aquí: here (nearest)
  2. acá: here (nearer)
  3. ahí: there (a little less near)
  4. allí: there (even less near)
  5. allá: there (even farther away) -- "over there"
  • You know I think you ar correct. I get mixed up. I think both "aqui" and "acá" are within the reach of the person talking. - Daniel Apr 23, 2011 flag
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