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Hi I am practicing my use of the future tense and if someone have the time I would appreciate it if you could proof read the following text. Thanks!

Ramón, tendrá una vida muy buena. Se casará con una chica española y tendrán muchos hijos. Continuará a vivir en Irlanda 10 años más y luego volverá a Francia. Trabajará con una compañía muy importante en Paris u después 2 años con ellos se hará el jefe y será muy rico. En su tiempo libre, Ramón y su familia viajarán por todo el mundo y visitarán muchos lugares interesantes.

Cada año durante el verano irá de vacaciones a Irlanda para ver a sus amigos irlandeses y hablarán de los tiempos antiguos. Sus hijos, irán a la universidad y cuando terminan sus carreras conseguirán muy buen trabajo. Cuando tiene unos 60 años se jubilará y volverá a vivir en Irlanda con su mujer.

  • Posted Feb 17, 2011
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  • English side: "if someone has (not have) the time" and I think the consensus is "proof read(ing)" should be one word nowadays. ;o) - cristalino Feb 17, 2011 flag

5 Answers

0 Vote

¡Excelente! Just minor corrections:

Continuará viviendo

París

de tiempos pasados

cuando terminen

cuanto tenga unos 60 años

0 Vote

Is this future past? Are you describing someone's life from the point of view from the present looking back on past events?

He will do that. Next he will do this. In the past from our now present view?

If not, none of this seems appropriate to future tense. It sound more like conjecture about future events or anticipated hypotheses warranting the subjunctive mood.

...y después de dos años...

Spanish future tense section on Usage.

0 Vote

Hola, Alan,

This is really minor, but you should remove the "comma" after Ramon in the very first sentence. It is unnecessary.

Otherwise, great job!

0 Vote

Is this future past? Are you describing someone's life from the point of view from the present looking back on past events?

He will do that. Next he will do this. In the past from our now present view?

If not, none of this seems appropriate to future tense. It sound more like conjecture about future events or anticipated hypotheses warranting the subjunctive mood.

...y después de dos años...

I'm going to disagree with this. When speaking about the future from the point of view of the past, you usually use "would" in English and the conditional in Spanish

The future tense in Spanish translates more closely to "might" than "will", and so is quite useable for predictions about the future (that need to be verified) as well as probabalistic statements about the present.

I really don't understand why you would use the subjunctive here, since you are making a probabalistic declaration, unless you thought it wasn't going to happen.

  • So you think that predicting what someone will do for the next 10 year, then for 2 yrs., then at 60 is probable; not speculative. You must do well in the stock market. - 0074b507 Feb 17, 2011 flag
  • The link I cited says the future tense is used for speculating about the present. The present is used for near future events. The future is for making declarations about the far future. There is too much specific detail given here to be a declaration - 0074b507 Feb 17, 2011 flag
  • (probable) about the far future. It makes sense if speaking about the past. If we are describing events that have already transpired I see no reason for would or conditional. - 0074b507 Feb 17, 2011 flag
  • Not meant as a criticism, if it came across that way. Just explaining my viewpoint and it is why I "asked" if it were future past. - 0074b507 Feb 17, 2011 flag
0 Vote

So you think that predicting what someone will do for the next 10 year, then for 2 yrs., then at 60 is probable; not speculative. You must do well in the stock market.

The link I cited says the future tense is used for speculating about the present. The present is used for near future events. The future is for making declarations about the far future. There is too much specific detail given here to be a declaration (probable) about the far future. It makes sense if speaking about the past. If we are describing events that have already transpired I see no reason for would or conditional.

Not meant as a criticism, if it came across that way. Just explaining my viewpoint and it is why I "asked" if it were future past.

Here is a link to another page on the same site that explains that the conditional is used to refer to the future from the past. The same construction is used in English:

prediction about the future:
Tom lives with his parents. He will get married and have two children. He will live to be 98.

statements about what was the future in the past:
Tom lived with his parents. He would get married and have two children. He would live to be 98.

All statements about the future are speculative. Some can be expressed in the present indicative, the future indicative, the present subjunctive, or the past subjunctive, and perhaps other options.

I think that one of the differences between English and Spanish is that in Spanish the present, future, and conditional tenses can all be used to refer to events in the past, present, or future.

  • I sorry, we are speaking about different animals. I am talking about reporting events that did happen in the past. Not things that are future in the past that may or may not transpire. Perhaps future past is a poor description. I see your viewpoint. - 0074b507 Feb 18, 2011 flag
  • Can you see mine? A narration of things that did occur in the past from the present point of view. I am not referring to what may happen from a past point of view. - 0074b507 Feb 18, 2011 flag
  • In English it would be a lot of sentences saying "and then he went on to...or next, he will". It is an arcane viewpoint. I shouldn't have brought it up, but speculating about the far future to me is not a declaration, but a supposition using things - 0074b507 Feb 18, 2011 flag
  • es posible que... and the subjunctive. - 0074b507 Feb 18, 2011 flag
  • My examples in English using would are narratives about things that did happen in the past. I do see your point, but even when refering to the future, the Spanish future tense is much less of a declaration than using will in English--it's more like might. - lorenzo9 Feb 18, 2011 flag
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