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I know "a la hora" means on time but that doesn't make sense in the following sentence in my book:

Los sábados que estoy en Madrid me levanto a la hora de todos los días y a veces voy de compras.

Would "a la hora" here mean "at the same time as" everyday?

¡Gracias!

  • Posted Feb 3, 2011
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0 Vote

I know "a la hora" means on time but that doesn't make sense in the following sentence in my book

HI Pibo, nice postgrin

A la hora actually does not mean on time, but "at the time..."

So, a la hora en punto: at 1 o'clock sharp

A la hora de ayer: the same time as yesterday

A la hora de todos los días: The same time as usual (like every day)

0 Vote

The satudays when I am in Madrid I wake up on time all te days and at times I go shopping.

Why do feel on time is wrong here?

0 Vote

Thanks, soms. I don't think "on time" is the right term to use in English because there is not a "deadline" to speak of. Unlike being on time for the train or for a meeting, there isn't a particular time to meet in this context. "I wake up on time all the days..." On time for what? It doesn't make sense in English. So, I wanted to find out what concept is being expressed here. Did she mean she woke up at, say 8 o'clock, every Saturday that she was in Madrid? The same time as the other days of the week?

  • Thanks for the reply :) - soms Feb 3, 2011 flag
0 Vote

Hi Pibosan,

I would translate it as follows:

Los sábados que estoy en Madrid me levanto a la hora de todos los días y a veces voy de compras.

The saturdays at which I am in Madrid I get up at the same time as every day and sometimes I go shopping.

"A la hora de todos los días" would literally translate as "on the time of everyday".

Hope this helps!

Saludos, Chica

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Thanks, Heidita and Chica. It much clearer for me now. ¡Muchismas gracias!

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