2

Votes

La palabra del día para hoy es "llamativo"

Significa: (adjective) eye-catching, bright, gaudy, showy

¿Se puede usar la palabra para describir una persona también (por favor lee el ejemplo)?

Ejemplo: --¡Ojo! Esa chica es muy bella. -- Si, tenes razón. Ella es muy llamativa.

¿Se la puede usar así (como decir "beautiful" o "stunning" en ingles?

Por favor me decís si o no, y de donde sos.

¡Gracias!

  • Posted Jan 30, 2011
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5 Answers

1

Votes

Hi enriquei, welcome to the forum. We have a game which we play each day: La palabra del Día: llamativo Over there, we make up sentences with the word of the day. You can see the different usages of the words. And our native friends correct our mistakes, therefore you can see the corrections and how you shouldn't do it as well, it's a nice exercise, you should try it. wink

  • Jan 30, 2011
  • | Edited by culé Jan 30, 2011
  • | link
  • Thank you culé. I will read over there. I am kind of somewhere between native speaker and second language. Spanish is my first language, but I was born (and spent much of my childhood, and all of my adult life) in the US. - enrique07 Jan 30, 2011
  • Therefore, some more intricate word usage is lost on me... which is unfortunate. :( - enrique07 Jan 30, 2011
  • Yes it is, but also you are much luckier than a lot of people here... A little practice will make you better, I'm sure! ;) - culé Jan 30, 2011
  • Don´´t worry given that there is no single English words that fits , even a native speaker might have trouble translating this one. - BellaMargari Jan 30, 2011
0

Votes

Es muy llamativa.

No subject pronoun!!! ; The sentence is correct.

  • Jan 30, 2011
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  • I do not believe it is incorrect to leave the pronoun -- in this case it may be best to leave it, to avoid confusion (talking about her -- not necessarily her garments, how she is dressed, etc). - enrique07 Jan 30, 2011
  • Please tell me if I am incorrect, however. :) - enrique07 Jan 30, 2011
  • You don't need the pronoun in this case because the adjective llamativa always refers to her (female person or object). Leaving Ella only makes the sentence wordy but not incorrect - gone Jan 30, 2011
  • Thank you; I figured I'd leave it in for the example to be as pure as possible.. but I wouldn't talk like that (unless I was speaking with a scatter-brained friend who was easily confused/distracted or a new Spanish speaker) - enrique07 Jan 30, 2011
0

Votes

Thank you; I figured I'd leave it in for the example to be as pure as possible.. but I wouldn't talk like that (unless I was speaking with a scatter-brained friend who was easily confused/distracted or a new Spanish speaker)

HI enrique, please read this about the use of subject pronouns, they are simply not used in Spanishwink

  • Jan 30, 2011
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  • I disagree. Ella es dentista o es dentista is a good example. Dentista comes from the greek and is a feminine noun for both men an women. You can use the pronoun to be more specific. The same goes for economista, estadista, publicista, etc. - gone Jan 30, 2011
0

Votes

HI enrique, please read [this] about the use of subject pronouns, they are simply not used in Spanish

Hi Heidita, I read the link... however, having been up the past 30 hours does not afford me the ability to maintain focus for more than a few seconds. I will re-read it when I have more time.

That being said, stopping to think about it, running conversations in my mind, and going back and re-reading some of the articles I read earlier this morning, I am convinced that you are correct.

I suppose it is a part of english that has crept in. I'm somewhat surprised and disappointed. :(

0

Votes

delete.