2

Votes

my cousin, who speaks Spanish only, texted me this message, "Tu es morido para mi". I am a married woman, and i believe "morido" says something about my husband. thank you.

  • I think maybe it should say: Tú eres muerto para mi. You think? - n8er8er Jan 21, 2011
  • If his native language is Spanish, what country is he from? - lagartijaver Jan 21, 2011
  • muerta,mí - lorenzo9 Jan 21, 2011

9 Answers

2

Votes

I think about two possibilities:

  1. Estás muerta para mí. You're dead to me.

  2. Tu ex-marido, para mí. Your ex-husband is for me (mine).

¿? What doy you think?

  • Either way, these are not things that a native Spanish speaker would ever write or say. Not like that. - Gekkosan Jan 21, 2011
  • But two good ideas, I guess we'll never know! - margaretbl Jan 21, 2011
1

Votes

Let me take another guess. "Marido" is husband.

Could this text mean "you are husband to me"?

  • Jan 21, 2011
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1

Votes

Quien construyó la frase no lo hizo bien.

Podemos suponer que no sabe castellano correctamente y puso "morido" queriendo decir "muerto".

Habría conjugado el verbo morir de forma errónea,así:

Yo estoy morido.

Tu estás morido...

En este caso habria querido decir: "Tú estás muerta para mí" o lo que es lo mismo: "desde este momento,no existes para mí"(=This is the end of our friendship)

  • Jan 21, 2011
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1

Votes

I'd stay well clear of anyone who sent me text messages like that if I didn't already know them very well, and understood what that was all about.

  • Jan 21, 2011
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1

Votes

Evidentemente, tu primo (o prima) no sabe hablar ni escribir correctamente el español, aunque éste sea su único idioma.

  • Jan 21, 2011
  • | Edited by Agora Jan 21, 2011
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0

Votes

Fmelvin, we usually encourage members to use the translator on this site, but this phrase has some words and structure that are not clear (to me at least).

Taken literally, by my guess, it means "you are dead to me". But it could mean something else if considered in context.

Please wait on a more experienced member to respond. I'm not sure about this one.

Welcome to the forum!

  • Jan 21, 2011
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  • Yes, "morido" is the problem.Maybe it's some sort of slang otherwise I'd be looking for "muerto - lagartijaver Jan 21, 2011
  • You are probably correct. I wish I had not responded to this one. - 0066c384 Jan 21, 2011
  • Worth a shot. Lorenzo is right of course she's female so "muerta" - lagartijaver Jan 21, 2011
  • Almost every word is grammatically incorrect. Either this person's language skills are poor or they are making fun of someone. - lorenzo9 Jan 21, 2011
  • Text messages are the bane of civilized language. :) - 0066c384 Jan 21, 2011
0

Votes

my cousin, who speaks Spanish only

That's what bothers me. doesn't that suggest the person is a native speaker? Still, no worries...Next!! grin

  • Jan 21, 2011
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  • true, but sometimes native speakers write their own language more poorly than foreigners. Certainly the natives speak it better, but when it comes to writing, either they are careless, or had a poor educational background. - stolidwolf Jan 21, 2011
  • This is not about correct writing. "Tu es morido para mi" is not something that even an illiterate person would *say*. Even assuming that the person means "ex-marido" (ex-husband), the phrase makes no sense. - Gekkosan Jan 21, 2011
0

Votes

That statement reeks of lunacy.

  • Jan 21, 2011
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0

Votes

Well, as someone said above, it is definetly a badly-conjugated word

The right sentence would be the following :

Tú estás muerta para mí / You're dead to me.

I hope I helped.