4

Votes

I'm wondering about the phrase "hacer de (verb)".

Voy a hacer de comer = I'm going to eat

Why is "hacer de" used here? What is the nuance? Any other examples of how to use it? Thanks!!

  • Posted Nov 17, 2010
  • | 9086 views
  • | link

6 Answers

2

Votes

In Mexico is very common to use it like that...

Voy a hacerle de comer a mi familia (I'm going to prepare the food for my family)

Voy a hacer de desayunar (I'm going to make breakfast)

If it's wrong... I can't tell... since most people use it here like that

  • Nov 18, 2010
  • | link
1

Votes

Voy a hacer de comer. Voy a hacer algo de comer?

I'm gonna fix something to eat?

Edit: I often come across the implied algo.

Edit 2: read this thread Implied algo

  • Nice link Jeez - Izanoni1 Nov 17, 2010
  • Thanks, I hope it applies here as well. - jeezzle Nov 17, 2010
1

Votes

One of my students in Mexico always said "tengo que levantarme temprano para hacer de comer". [I have to get up early to get breakfast ready]... I have the impression that this expression is not unusual in Mexico.

As to why there is a "de" there - who knows? There just is! Even though a grammatical reason could be researched, this is probably one of those cases of languages not always being scientifically logical.

  • Nov 17, 2010
  • | link
0

Votes

EDIT: I had this wrong so I deleted it :~).

0

Votes

According to the DPD, it's an error to interpose the preposition "de" between "hacer" and an infinitive. However, it also goes on to say that this error is common error in everyday speech.

No debe interponerse la preposición de entre hacer y el infinitivo, como ocurre a veces en el habla popular:

«¡Lo que nos ha hecho de reír! ¡Las cosas que a él se le han ocurrío en la iglesia!» (Benavente Señora [Esp. 1908]); incorrect
«Yo sé que les gusta hacerte de rabiar y llamarte cosas feas» (Zamora Traque [Esp. 1972]).incorrect

In this case; however, it looks like Jeezle is probably right in suggesting that the word "algo" has likely been omitted here

0

Votes

[Check Marianne][1]

[1]: When do you use

  • Nov 17, 2010
  • | link
  • In that thread, you might notice that the word that follows the preposition "de" in each case is not an infinitive but a noun. In this case, these examples would not apply to the original question - Izanoni1 Nov 17, 2010