4

Votes

I'm not sure that this is the correct spelling, or even that "fuegas" is the correct word. However, I heard it frequently when growing up in situations where the speaker was aggravated/impatient. It clearly had a negative connotation.

(I used to think it was "fiegas" but I don't think there's such a word in Spanish, although I could be completely wrong.)

Maybe some context would help.... "Grandma, can you give me another drink of water? I spilled my milk again. Can you help me, I don't understand this.... etc."

Grandmother: Oh, como fuegos!

thanks!

9 Answers

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I have never heard "como fuegas" but if it was used in Mexico, most likely it was "¡Cómo friegas!" (You´re such pain in the a - -). This is a very common slang expression originating for the verb "fregar" (to scrub).

If you are being bothered by many things in general, you can also say "¡Me lleva la fregada!"


MORF. conjug. c. acertar.

ya la fregamos.

  1. expr. vulg. Méx. U. para indicar que algo resultó mal.

ya ni la friegas.

  1. expr. vulg. Méx. U. para indicar a alguien que está siendo muy molesto.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

  • Interesting, giving this meaning and context, I think this is much more likely. Gets my vote. ;-P - DJ_Huero Apr 7, 2011
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Julian Chivi, THANK YOU! I have wondered what this meant for the last 40 years or so but since no one ever knew what I was talking about , I gave up trying to find out.

Sadly, your definition fits exactly. She spoke "Mexican" Spanish, was conversant in Mexican slang, and I KNEW it sounded like "fiegas" but obviously there is no such word! And yes, Felix77, she did indeed swear like a "trouper."

wow. thanks again.

  • Apr 8, 2011
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  • "Fregar" is also used to indicate something breaking or becoming inoperable, ie: "Se me fregó el coche" also "Se me amoló el coche" (My car broke down) - JulianChivi Apr 8, 2011
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Hi , you probably mean : como fuegOs

and it means : like fires .

  • Sep 11, 2010
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  • I added some context since I still don't get it. :) - NancyPH Sep 11, 2010
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Como - can mean as or like.

Fuego - means fire.

So I wonder if it's equivalent to the English 'like hell'? But that is a total guess confused confused confused

  • Sep 11, 2010
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  • plus it sounds a bit harsh coming from a Grandma lol - Kiwi-Girl Sep 11, 2010
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You problably mean to say "Como quieras", which is roughly translated as "whatever" if the reply has a negative tone, or "as you wish" if the tone is more neutral. "Fuegas" doesn't exist in spanish, and "fuegos" doesn't make any sense in that context.

  • Sep 11, 2010
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  • No, it wasn't "quieras," I'm sure. - NancyPH Sep 11, 2010
  • Hm, other replies that could (somewhat) fit in there would be "como fuera", though that one is used as part of a sentence, or "como prefieras", "como quieras" - bill1111 Sep 11, 2010
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caer como fuego question

  • Sep 11, 2010
  • | Edited by Gocika Sep 11, 2010
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  • I can assure you this expression would never be used in situations like the one the OP mentioned ;-) - bill1111 Sep 11, 2010
  • what does this mean?? We are not talking about a nice gradma here... - NancyPH Sep 11, 2010
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It means "Oh how you bother me," as in, "Como fuegas, Romo, stop beating me with a slipper.

  • Apr 7, 2011
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I would agree with the idea Kiwi Girl threw out there.

"Como fuegos" would be, "like hell".

Por ejemplo:

Person A:

Ey güey, ¿vamos a fumar?

Person B:

¡Como fuegos güey!

  • Apr 7, 2011
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Having read all the posts and comments above I can hardly imagine that your grandma swears like a trouper confused rolleyes mad so she may well have said, as Bill indicated possible:

como prefieras o como quieres = as you prefer/wish

Or she could have said como fuego = meaning like fire (rather than like h&**)

I hope that helps grin