3

Votes

As an idiom, I think it means not to put yourself into a dangerous situation, but I am not sure. I would like some guidance from native speakers. Thanks in advance.

  • Posted Jul 28, 2010
  • | 36444 views
  • | link

10 Answers

7

Votes

It's a Colombian expression which colloquially it means:

Don’t get caught sleeping ......or

Don’t put yourself in a position where you become vulnerable to be taken advantage of.

  • Jul 28, 2010
  • | link
  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013
5

Votes

With spanish you have to understand that a certain phrase could mean different things depending on which country, or even which region of a country you are.

"Dar papaya" in Colombia in general (I'm pretty sure this phrase is Colombian, but other's might correct me if I'm wrong) means "Putting yourself in a position where someone can take advantage of you"

For example: You were sitting in a restaurant, left your bag unattended and someone took it from you, because your weren't paying attention

It can also be used for other situations like for instance when a co worker doesn't like you, and you say or do something that compromises you, he sees that and turns you in.

I'm Colombian, by the way smile

  • Jul 23, 2013
  • | link
  • That is how my Colombian friend explained it to me (more so with not putting yourself in a position to be robbed). - Maldito23 Jul 23, 2013
  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013
3

Votes

Hi, if it was translated literally it would mean don't give 'fruit/papaya' but it basically means don't put yourself into situations where you are more likly to be taken advantage of but what you said generally means the same also. Hope I helped you on this one smile

  • Jul 28, 2010
  • | link
  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013
3

Votes

I will mention that I am NOT a native speaker so you can wait for confirmation from one and discount my response! I do happen to know that 'dar papaya' is like a provocation, something stupid or without thought - an English equivalent would be 'asking for it'. Dejar su coche en la calle es como dar papaya a la gentuza.

  • Jul 28, 2010
  • | link
  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013
3

Votes

I would translate it as: don´t get caught with your pants down.

  • Jul 28, 2010
  • | link
  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013
3

Votes

no it doesn't change according to anything. It's very simple, no dar papaya means "don't be stupid and dont put yourself in a vulnerable situation when others could take advantage of you!!! " no de papaya!!!

  • Nov 15, 2011
  • | link
  • Yes, all the answers seem to agree. - annierats Nov 15, 2011
  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013
2

Votes

In my native language means "don't give any one a hard time" smile smile

  • Jul 28, 2010
  • | link
  • Welcome to the forum, cecil! - sanlee Jul 28, 2010
  • Ought we assume that your native languages is Spanish? (your profile gives no indication) - samdie Jul 28, 2010
  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013
2

Votes

Don't give a precious gift to the robbers .. papaya is a valued fruit ... don't leave it lying around. In practice don't flash your expensive phone or watch around because you will be inviting robbers to gratefully relieve you of it.

  • Jan 29, 2012
  • | link
  • Hi and welcome to the forum! Thank you, NickDun! - sanlee Jan 29, 2012
  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013
2

Votes

"Dar papaya" in Colombia in general (I'm pretty sure this phrase is Colombian, but other's might correct me if I'm wrong) means "Putting yourself in a position where someone can take advantage of you"

I heard this expression from a Colombian, but I have no idea if it's used anywhere else. To my knowledge it is largely a Colombian expression.

Echanse un vistazo a este link:

Dar Papaya

  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013
1

Votes

Thanks for your answers. I am still not sure I understand it. This phrase seems to change according to its locality. And it seems to have a broad meaning.

  • Jul 28, 2010
  • | link
  • Why don´t you try giving us the context where you´ve found the phrase? That´s usually the key to get the best answer. - mediterrunio Jul 30, 2010
  • This was a phrase book entry and I was trying to figure it out. Thanks - sanlee Jul 30, 2010
  • ¡Muchas gracias! - sanlee Jul 24, 2013