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4 Vote

Is there another way to say "you're welcome" besides "de nada."

  • Posted May 25, 2010
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11 Answers

3 Vote

Hi,

There is. In Costa Rica, for example, it is more common to say "con gusto" (with pleasure) or "mucho gusto." In some places you will hear "por nada," which is similar in meaning to "de nada."

3 Vote

"De qué". "no hay de qué", "No es nada". "Gracias a ti".

  • I am familiar with the last 3 de que is an interesting idiom - FELIZ77 May 25, 2010 flag
2 Vote

No hay de que.

1 Vote

My Ecuadorian friend, married to a Mexican who lives in L.A. lol (as in not sure where this is more common) usually says:

Por nada smile

1 Vote

Es mi placer = it's my pleasure

1 Vote

Like Chris126 said:

In Costa Rica, for example, it is more common to say "con gusto" (with pleasure) or "mucho gusto." In some places you will hear "por nada," which is similar in meaning to "de nada."

This is very true

1 Vote

"El placer es mío." = the pleasure is mine

I've also heard this said in response to my saying: "Mucho gusto"' when I first meet someone. And, sometimes the response to my "Mucho gusto" is: "El gusto es mío"

0 Vote

So you can't say "Bienvenido" like in french or english? Interesting.

0 Vote

No, you can't use bienvenido because it has/would have a subtely different meaning when applied to the sentence.

For example:

Estamos encantado de dar la bienvenida hoy a todas nuestras visitantes. aquí

= We are pleased to welcome all our visitors here, today

Although we use the expression in English 'you are welcome' it actually means/the real heart of its meaning is: ' it's my pleasure' or 'don't mention it' (In fact we use the word welcome in many different contexts)

In Spanish don't mention it is best translated as = de nada o no hay de que

When translating idioms/exressions from English into Spanish or into any other language (or visa versa) it is absolutely essential to know the heart of the meaning you are trying to convey rather than to attempt translating phrases literally 'word for word'. This is because these idiomatic expressions do not literally translate well between languages and to attempt do so will usually result in a loss of intended meaning or a change of meaning and could - in extreme situations.- even unintentionally cause offence

  • Never occurred to me that "Welcome" in that context was an idiom. - salsero69 Jun 7, 2010 flag
0 Vote

por nada.. that's what mi hermana cubana dice...

0 Vote

"Las que tu tienes."

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