1 Vote

Just curious of the usage here. Te me vas y todavia me juras que es la ultima, es mejor si no me fio. I think it says " You go to me and still, I swear that it's the last time, it's better that I don't trust. Thoughts? It's from Laura Pausini, the best Spanish language singer, and her song "Entre tu y mil mares".

  • Posted Dec 14, 2009
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7 Answers

1 Vote

Te me vas y todavia me juras que es la ultima, es mejor si no me fio.

I think that it is probably something like:

You are leaving me and are still promising me that it's the last time. It's better if I don't believe (you).

I think that if you look at the lines that come after this part it shows her lament over the fact that she can't bear the person leaving again:

no puedo dividirme ya entre tú y mil mares,

no puedo ahora estarme quieta y esperarte.

no puedo dividirme ya entre tú y mil mares

  • This should probably be "es mejor si no me fío de ti" it´s better that I don´t trust or rely on you. - Eddy Dec 23, 2009 flag
  • This is by and far the best answer., Eddy's comment included. - Gekkosan May 7, 2010 flag
1 Vote

Well just keep in mind that "vas" comes from the verb "Ir" and "me vas" comes from the verb "irse", which is a reflexive verb that has different meanings depending on the context.

In this context it means "leaving".. ("Irse" can also mean "to depart", "to die", "to go away" + + )

0 Vote

Te me vas means: you're going!!!!!! Hope i helped!!!!!!!!!

  • That's not right. You are leaving me. - Gekkosan May 7, 2010 flag
0 Vote

You go to me and still, I swear

No. juras is the You form. wink


Te me vas

I'm voting that it's "you're leaving me" instead of coming to me. I'm prolly wrong though.

This is interesting to me, as I just had a conversation at work with someone what 'me voy' vs 'yo voy' means.. I hope a native pipes in to set me straight.

  • doh, slip up. You go to me and still you swear to me that it's the last time. crazy. - jeezzle Dec 14, 2009 flag
  • :) Is it 'you go to me', or, 'you're leaving me'? - cheeseisyumm Dec 14, 2009 flag
  • that is the question of the day my cheesy friend...... - jeezzle Dec 14, 2009 flag
0 Vote

That's where it gets weird to me because "te vas" = you are leaving and "vas" = you are going so does "te me vas" mean you are leaving me? Are we very sure? How would we say you are going to me? Me vas? Is it still leaving even with the "me" in the middle?

  • You got me. :( Now I'm not gonna be able to sleep until this is answered - cheeseisyumm Dec 14, 2009 flag
  • Ok, for 'you are going to me', would ir even be used, or would you use the verb venir instead? as in 'coming to me' ? - cheeseisyumm Dec 14, 2009 flag
  • R.p., i.o.p.,d.o.p. is the order. Te me vas or Me te voy, but not... me te vas or te me voy. The first pronoun must match the verb if it is a reflexive pronoun. - 0074b507 Dec 24, 2009 flag
  • We are VERY sure. You are leaving (on me) - you are doing this to ME - thus,"You are leaving me." - Gekkosan May 7, 2010 flag
0 Vote

I don't see how "me vas" would be irse. "Te vas" would be irse. It just seems to me that "me te vas" would be "you're leaving me" while "te me vas" sounds wierd if it really means you're leaving me.

  • "Me te vas" makes no sense at all. "Te me" means you are doing - verb action- to me or for me. Te me vas, te me callas, te me sales. - Gekkosan May 7, 2010 flag
0 Vote

If this was "you come to me", I would have thought they would be using a verb like volver or regresar. Plus the fact that almost all sad love songs, and this one sounds sad, are about lovers leaving and not arriving, hence the line about not trusting or relying on someone.

  • That makes sense. Volver or regresar would be better for come. - jeezzle Dec 23, 2009 flag
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