6

Votes

250 en inglés

25 Answers

3

Votes

Hi all,

Wow...seems like a real debate!

I learned in high school and in college that you do not write the word "and" in between hundreds and tens, e.g. "one hundred and seventy-three" would be incorrect, while "one hundred seventy-three" would be correct. That seems pretty standard too in my experience. And as pointed out earlier, most people seem to get that when writing checks, but forget otherwise.

I spent a little while searching the Internet for something that would serve as a good reference, but didn't find anything 100% definitive...so I'll just have to base this on my prior education... "Two hundred fifty" is the correct way, while "two hundred and fifty" is something you must be prepared to encounter, because this is one of those gray areas where even native speakers obviously cannot agree on the rule....but JohnJuan makes a great point! wink

Here's a good reference for you, though it does not explicitly state the specific rule, take a look at the last example used in rule 7 which shows how to write out 12,154 http://www.grammarbook.com/numbers/numbers.asp

  • Sep 19, 2009
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  • In college, I was taught the same thing, arnold. On a university exam, "two hundred and fifty" would have been marked wrong. :) - Valerie Sep 19, 2009
  • And I was taught the opposite in college....go figure! - --Mariana-- Sep 19, 2009
  • hands up for banning this guy!! grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr - 00494d19 Sep 19, 2009
  • Nobody????? - 00494d19 Sep 19, 2009
  • jejeje.. - --Mariana-- Sep 19, 2009
2

Votes

En inglés se escrive 250 como "two hundred fifty" Espero que este ayudarte.

  • But, it will most often be said as "Two hundred AND fifty". - Moe Sep 19, 2009
  • Yes that is very true. When you write it on a check you would put two hundred fifty and when you say it you say two hundred and fifty (it's funny how English is sometimes) :) - Jason7R Sep 19, 2009
  • Written on a cheque, it is "code" for a bank. It is not proper English either on the cheque or in other written work. - Moe Sep 19, 2009
  • It is proper if you have change. For example Two hundred fifty and ------34/100 is how you would write it on a check. - Jason7R Sep 19, 2009
  • when my wife lets me write a check, I write $250 and xx cents. - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
2

Votes

Mi gran amigo Moe...si te lleva una persona con $250 en mano, y quiere regalarte con esto...no importa se dice two hundred and fifty, two fity, dosceintos cinquenta, etc. wink. Tambien...su tienes deudas de $250, a nadie le importa como lo dices! Just a thought. wink

  • Sep 19, 2009
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  • The question asked by Henry23 was "How do you write 250 in English". You have answered some other question. You are misleading Henry23. This is unacceptable. - Moe Sep 19, 2009
  • Todos lo hacen esto. No te sabes? Mejor preguntarse! - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
  • Moe, it's called humor, and it's actually more than acceptable, it's required! :) besides, he already gave the direct and correct answer earlier. - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
  • ¡Es verdad! - Jason7R Sep 19, 2009
2

Votes

I have absolutely nothing to add to this conversation, except that my father was an English major in college. He always corrected me when I used "and" when referring to money. Two hundred and fifty would have definitely been incorrect in my house.

What I wanted to say is that I never imagined that this question would have generated so much debate. I think it's great! grin

  • Sep 19, 2009
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  • I agree Nicole. It's great! Hopefully Moe and Nikkis will see your post and your father's credentials will add some credibility to what I said. - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
  • That's what I was taught too...but my teachers must have been quite wrong... - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
  • I was taught the opposite ...and I'm a unversity English major! This has turned out to be quite an interesting question! - --Mariana-- Sep 19, 2009
  • You're right Marianne. I stand corrected. It's not proper American English, but is is 100% proper British English. - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
2

Votes

Moe said:

C.H.A.L.L.E.N.G.E!

If you insist that it is not necessary to say or write

"Two hundred and fifty"

provide examples of circumstances or situations where something else would be acceptable "Good" English.

I don't know if this counts as proof, and I admit that I was surprised when I read that Arnold and Valerie were taught that they shouldn't write the "AND", but then I found this, that may explain something:

In British English use "and" when saying numbers in the hundreds. Example: seven hundred AND twenty seven. In American English do NOT use "and" when saying numbers in the hundreds. Example: seven hundred twenty seven.

Now, I challenge you to donate two hundred (and) fifty dollars to the charity organization of your choice. wink

  • Sep 19, 2009
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  • Good one! I will never look at the number 250 the same way again! - Nicole-B Sep 19, 2009
  • Great job, Viking! I would have bet $250 on "two hundred AND fifty." - --Mariana-- Sep 19, 2009
  • Hahaha, now that is best challenge I've seen! ;-) Thanks for clarifying the distinction between "American" English and "the Queen's" English on this one. - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
  • I'd love to donate $250 to my favorite charity! My favorite, according to my wife, is my wife! - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
  • Ahhhh, now I understand why she lets you write checks sometimes. - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
1

Votes

Por palabras se va two hundred fifty. Por numeros, se va iqual. wink

2 VOTE I have absolutely nothing to add to this conversation, except that my father was an English major in college. He always corrected me when I used "and" when referring to money. Two hundred and fifty would have definitely been incorrect in my house.

What I wanted to say is that I never imagined that this question would have generated so much debate. I think it's great!

I just wanted to copy this so people don't think I'm some nut case. That's exactly what I learned in college too. Well, I learned it in grade school, but we talked about it in economics as well.

  • But, it will most often be said as "Two hundred AND fifty". - Moe Sep 19, 2009
  • Depende donde este. Hay que dicen two hundred fifty, otros dicen two hundred fifty, otros dicen two fifty, mas otros dicen 2 fity. - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
  • Yes, true. - NikkiLR Sep 19, 2009
  • JohnJuan & Nikkis, I challenge the correctness of this. When this site tries to teach English, we should teach the best English and not argot/slang/streettalk. - Moe Sep 19, 2009
  • lol...calmate...porque te recodo esto? Si no sabes...yo soy quien soy... - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
1

Votes

Two hundred and fifty is how you write it.

And for example if it is 254, 255, ect. you write it like this...

Two hundred and fifty-four, two hundred and fifty-five

All those are the correct way.


As johnjuan said...

Some others say "two fifty" which is very common, probably more than the correct way. "Two hundred fifty" is also said.

1

Votes

C.H.A.L.L.E.N.G.E!

If you insist that it is not necessary to say or write

"Two hundred and fifty"

provide examples of circumstances or situations where something else would be acceptable "Good" English.

  • Sep 19, 2009
  • | Edited by Moe Sep 19, 2009
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  • I agree with Moe --- I would generally say "Two hundred AND fifty." - --Mariana-- Sep 19, 2009
1

Votes

I have already weighed in on the answer, but just want to remind everyone to please vote for the poster's question, which is obviously a good one! cheese

  • Sep 19, 2009
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1

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I am challenging too. cheese Moe, I am all with ya!

And searching and searching....I was surprised to see my friend Valerie who I know to be a teacher say: no and with numbers.

and this was it! I was taught, yes and with numbers so something had to be wrong here. wink

So I found this:

Note that in American English, many students are taught not to use the word and anywhere in the whole part of a number, so it is not used before the tens and ones. It is instead used as a verbal delimiter when dealing with compound numbers. Thus, instead of "three hundred and seventy-three", one would say "three hundred seventy-three". For details, see American and British English differences.

This of course explains it all. Have a look at the differences here, I also found this thread which I though would be very straightforward and easy to answer,quite fascinating, so after saying this is the correct answer:

two hundred and fifty cool smile

Henn is getting my vote, even though Marianne had too edit his post. Henn, this shows you some mistake in the thread title, please be more careful next time. wink

  • I edited to add question marks and the accents. - --Mariana-- Sep 19, 2009
  • Bravo, Heidi! - Valerie Sep 19, 2009
  • I followed you up to a point, but the logic of the article you referenced would lead you to say _both_ answers are correct, not just the one with the word and, unless you are implying "American" English is not correct when it differs from "British" Eng. - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
  • I'm so glad we are having this conversation and feel vindicated by it in a larger sense. I used to get crucified for pointing out we all speak spanish different. Looks to me we all write numbers different too. - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
  • Well, we don't write them different, in the totality, and we don't see them different, in totality, but we explain the same thing in different ways. - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
1

Votes

So, after Heidi's and Viking's research the answer to Henry's question is:

It depends on where you live!

  • Sep 19, 2009
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  • I have to agree with you. It depends on which version of English the poster wants to learn, "American" or "the Queen's" ;-) - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
  • Y ahi esta! - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
  • Well, of course, I have a bias toward American (USA) English, so I'll be saying "two hundred fifty" from now on! LOL - --Mariana-- Sep 19, 2009
1

Votes

Incredible!!

I just finished reading essentially the same thing that Vijingo has brought to our attention:

Note that in American English, it is non-standard to use the word and before tens and ones. It is instead used as a verbal delimiter when dealing with compound numbers . Thus, instead of "three hundred and seventy-three", Americans usually say (and write) "three hundred seventy-three". For details, see American and British English differences.

Now I can see why those of you living in the USA have steadfastly "stuck to your guns".

Chalk it up to another difference between how Canadians speak/write and how Americans do it.

So, Win/Win. We're both/all correct.

Recuerdos,

Moe

  • Sep 19, 2009
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  • Agreed Moe. We're all correct on this one! ;-) ...chalking up... - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
  • Couldn't agree more. :) - Jason7R Sep 19, 2009
  • I love it...it's like being in literature all over again. - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
1

Votes

I followed you up to a point, but the logic of the article you referenced would lead you to say both answers are correct, not just the one with the word and, unless you are implying "American" English is not correct when it differs from "British" Eng. - arnold3

Just in case I get flagged for my post...jeje, of course both are correct, Schwarzenegger(wink) , I was just kidding.

Anyway, if you live in Spain, you had better go with the British version, as yoou will be marked wrong if the and is not there. Marianne, jejejejejej, Valerie asked me if you were British! LOL

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  • YOU get flagged? Yea, cause that happens all the time! ;-) - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
  • jaja... - NikkiLR Sep 19, 2009
  • jejejejej, well I COULD get flagged! But people love me, what can I do...:P - 00494d19 Sep 20, 2009
1

Votes

Let me now refer to Moe, and how all of this relates very strongly to what we are all doing here, ie, learning or improving upon our spanish. Bueno...Moe is Canadian. In Canada, maybe the normal way to recon this number is Two Hundred and Fifty. That's not wrong. It's still $250, $200&50;, etc. Now...if Our Dear Friend Moe typed the way he talked, he would be putting "ehh?" at the end of many of his fraces because that's how Canadian English is spoken. Is it wrong? No. Is it something not a lot of people know about? Yes. Now...how does this enter into studying spanish? Well I'm glad you asked! How gracious of you! This demonstrates that there are particularities to spanish according to where it's spoken. Just like that "ehh?" thing Canadians do. It's not wrong per se, only different.

  • Who ever told you Canadians talk like that? Eh?? Hoser! - Moe Sep 19, 2009
  • lol...i'm a quite sofistikated person! - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
0

Votes

I feel bad for the original poster who simply wanted a direct answer. I can only imagine how confused he must be now.

Henry23 asked:

¿Cómo se escribe 250 en inglés?

Only Nikkis and Moe have provided him with a correct answer of "Two hundred and fifty."

  • Sep 19, 2009
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  • No es verdad, mi muneca. Yo le digo a el lo mismo. Mirete alla arriba. - ChamacoMalo Sep 19, 2009
  • Actually JohnJuan's answer was the correct one, i.e. Two Hundred Fifty, and how do you know the poster would not appreciate learning the nuances? I always do when I post a question. - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
  • Also, Jason7R gave him the correct, direct response as well. - arnold3 Sep 19, 2009
  • You're right...I stand corrected by Viking's research (see below). - --Mariana-- Sep 19, 2009