¿Qué has hecho? | SpanishDict Answers
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¿Qué has hecho? Say what you have done in perfecto or preterito, for what you have done in the recent past like today this morning, this week/month/year etc. or simply what you have done you could use perfecto otherwise use preterito, just follow my examples:

He navegado a las islas Baleares cuatro veces en mi velero. Perfecto.

En 2005 navegué a la isla de Ibiza. Preterito

Hoy he cenado fuera de casa con mi hijo.

Este fin de semana he visto un partido de fútbol en la tele.

Ayer fuí al mercado aire libre a comprar unos gangas

Hoy he nadado en el mar.

En abril visité a mi hermana quien vive en el reino unido.

Saludos Ken.

  • Posted Aug 9, 2009
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Sihara, presente perfecto = indicativo of the verb haber + the past participle of the verb you are using and it is used to express things you have done in the recent past such as today, this morning, this week/weekend/month/year/summer etc. whilst preterito on the other hand is used for the past as in yesterday, last night/week/year etc.

Big misconception, although your time references are correct. "He visto las pirámides" could have happened 30 years ago, and "Se enfadó y se fue" could refer to something that happened minutes ago. Either tense could refer to things that happened seconds... or millenia ago, but the preterite is terminated and disconnected from the present moment, whereas the present perfect is related to the present moment.

  • Yes I understand this, in fact in my first example I said "he navegado a las islas Baleares cuatro veces" and the first of those four times was in the year 2002 so I wasn't using that example as something I have done in the recent past and the last time I - kenwilliams Aug 12, 2009 flag
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En abril visité a mi hermana que vive en el Reino Unido.

You cannot use the relative "quien" in these clauses when it is the subject. "Fui" has no accent. Everything else is fine.

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No sé el perfecto.

Hoy subí el Runyon Canyon para el primer vez.

Hoy, hice un video por el webcam y le puse en el blog de mis amigas.

Este fin de semana, leí dos libros y comí mucho.

Este verano, viajé a Nueva York y visité a mis hermanos.

  • la primera vez - lo puse en el blog - samdie Aug 10, 2009 flag
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Sihara, presente perfecto = indicativo of the verb haber + the past participle of the verb you are using and it is used to express things you have done in the recent past such as today, this morning, this week/weekend/month/year/summer etc. whilst preterito on the other hand is used for the past as in yesterday, last night/week/year etc.so you would say: Hoy he subido or ayer subí. Hoy he hecho un video y he puesto en el blog de mis amigas. Este fin de semana he leido dos libros y he comido mucho. Este verano he viajado a Nueva York y he visitado a mis hermanas. He entiendo que has disfrutado esté verano. Saludos Ken.

  • Thanks. I'm on to that next. I have no idea how to conjugate either 'haber' or 'subido, puesto' etc. - Sihara Aug 11, 2009 flag
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What sense does it make to refer to the preterite and the present perfect as "pretérito" and "perfecto" since both are perfected?

If we must abbreviate their titles wouldn't it make more sense to call them the simple past (pretérito simple) and the compound present (presente compuesto)?

I've seen this use of "pretérito" and "perfecto" used before, but I thought it was by non-natives writing in Spanish.

Do natives scratch their heads when we shorten their very descriptive titles of pretérito perfecto simple, pretérito imperfecto, and pretérito perfecto compuesto and say "no wonder they can't learn how to use them".

Sihara, presente perfecto = [presente] indicativo of the verb haber + the past participle of the verb...

Is "presente perfecto" and accepted title for this tense?

Spanish verb titles

aside: previous thread about imperative mood: this author lists the 1st person, plural, indirect command under the imperative mood.

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Sihara, You say that you have no idea how to conjugate the verbs subir, haber and poner, well along the top of the home page just hover your curser over the word "more" and then from the drop down menu clic on congugation and you will have every spanish verb at your disposal then just enter the verb in the box and clic on congugate, take subir for example scroll down to "presente perfecto" and there you will have the congugations in first, second and third person singular and plural. regards Ken.

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What sense does it make to refer to the preterite and the present perfect as "pretérito" and "perfecto" since both are perfected?

Hold on! You are assuming that "pretérito" is the name of the Spanish tense, but the word "pretérito" means "past", so any tense that refers to the past is a "pretérito". Some tenses are perfective and some are not, so the word "perfecto" is used to indicate their perfective aspect. Bear in mind that other tenses like future can also be perfective or imperfective.

I've seen this use of "pretérito" and "perfecto" used before, but I thought it was by non-natives writing in Spanish.

On the contrary: this is the name we all learn at school, and the name used by the RAE.

Is "presente perfecto" and accepted title for this tense?

Many natives who have not familiar with English grammar will not recognize such term.

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Hold on! You are assuming that "pretérito" is the name of the Spanish tense, but the word "pretérito" means "past", so any tense that refers to the past is a "pretérito". Some tenses are perfective and some are not, so the word "perfecto" is used to indicate their perfective aspect. Bear in mind that other tenses like future can also be perfective or imperfective.

No, actually I'm not. Just the opposite. I'm complaining that I believe the author is making that assumption when he uses pretérito for pretérito perfecto simple and perfecto for pretérito perfecto compuesto. See how he labels his first two sentences.

What I was saying is that calling the preterite by pretérito and the present perfect by perfecto seems illogical since both of those are perfected, past tenses.

On the contrary: this is the name we all learn at school, and the name used by the RAE.

Let me make sure that I understand you clearly. A Spaniard uses the term "pretérito" to mean "pretérito perfecto simple" and "perfecto" to mean "pretérito perfect compuesto"? I must be misunderstanding you in light of your previous comment about "pretérito" just meaning past and "perfecto" just meaning perfected Or are you saying that pertérito and perfecto are used by the RAE to mean past and perfected. (not referring to a specific tense)..

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